Apparently…

…I am the limit.

It’s good to know your limits and, thankfully, my GP recognised his. He only asked one really dumb question before realising I knew more about my conditions than he did. (Note to everyone: if you know someone who suffers from long-term, recurrent depression, it’s not really helpful to ask “Is there anything going on in your life right now which might be upsetting you?” I was remarkably restrained with my answer.)

The upshot is that he handed over a box of tissues, listened to my “quick guide to Stacey”, read the last few letters from my consultant, then told me to phone him myself as it would be quicker than doing an official referral.

He knew his limit and stuck with it; the best thing a GP can do. It’s not a sign of weakness, admitting you can’t do something or help further. It’s a sign of strength.

It’s also something I need to remember, although I’m a lot better at accepting my limits now than ever before.

Some of you have been kind (and wise) enough to remind me of this through messages etc. I’d just like to say a massive THANKS for all your support. The best came from Lovely Boyfriend, who managed a quick call from the helipad of his rig as they were towed close enough to land to get  mobile reception. That, plus the girls at rehearsal, meant I had a smile on my face last night.

Today will be a quiet one of NaNoWriMo preparation, knitting and waiting for my consultant to call back.

PS. Doctors are getting younger. It’s strange to think that I’m older than my own GP. Six years ago, there was one “young” doctor in the practise. He’s now the oldest…

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3 thoughts on “Apparently…

  1. How do you feel when you encounter a younger doctor or therapist? Are you comfortable? Do you question their experience/ability?

    Accepting our limits is a hard thing, but for anxiety it is key. There are things that we can not control, they are dealt with as they, if they, occur. Getting comfortable with that is hard but important. With depression though, often our limits are not as we see them, depression defines them, they may not be our limits at all.

    Good luck with the referral, I hope it is someone that you can be comfortable with, this is important.

    • It’s strange having a younger doctor because I don’t consider myself as old! I know my consultant well, having seen him on a weekly basis for the 2.5 years I was hospitalised. He isn’t as old as I thought either, but he’s older than me at least.
      Age brings experience but sometimes a fresh pair of eyes will spot something an older pair miss. I found the older doctors at my practise to be less open about mental health issues. They didn’t seem to understand it the way the younger staff at the health centre do. Hopefully this is the start of better treatment from the off.

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